Saturday, July 12, 2008

Friday, April 18, 2008

ATB

Hello Bloggers,

Ok - So I've not posted in awhile. I've delved into Facebook and Myspace and I am little confused and drained.........

I gotta say - I should just focus on KLKSpeaks with its templates and easy add on's....

Ok - as I set up my Myspace they ask for your favorite music...blah,blah - mundane - blah , blah- write something to make yourself sound interesting - blah, blah...

Anyway - I adore trance music. i know - I'm 41. I'm not a gay man, I do not do ectasy and never go to clubs - but I LOVE it!

One of my favorite DJ's is ATB. NOW - before any Trance heads beat me up - ATB is a very "pop" version of Trance and many "hardcore trance fans" hate him. BUT I love him. Paul Van dyk and ATB are my favorites...

Here is a YouTube clip of an ATB rundown - I think Long Way Home shold have been #1 but that is just my opinion...


Monday, March 17, 2008

KLK Shouts Out

The blank screen is actually my "talkie blog" so be sure to click on it and hear about all of my Shout Outs before you click on the links below.

~KLK

video


Shout Outs





http://kurtgibbons.com/vcpa/shows.html

http://kerryomalley.net/

http://www.thomascaruso.com/



Thursday, March 6, 2008

Ghost Hunters



People. You gotta love this show.

I have a very strange crush on Jason and Grant.

I've always had a fascination with the paranormal. I remember being a kid and sitting in front of our crappy TV waiting for In Search Of to come on. It was a TV show hosted by Leonard Nimoy that explored BigFoot, Ghosts and the Loch Ness monster, ect....

I loved that shizzle.

When I was a little, little girl I had a very strange experience with someone at the end of my bed and then later in college I saw, what seemed to be a ghost, in the campus theatre.

Now - to this day I've chalked these experiences up to my heroin addiction but who knows!

Seriously, this show, whether you are a beliver or not, is just fun.

Thursday, February 28, 2008

RENT





I don't usually talk too much about RENT as it was so many things. It is hard to talk about something that was such a beautifully sad and miraculous experience. I was and still am honored to have been a part of it.

With RENT's closing in June and the article that came out this week in Entertainment Weekly I thought I'd post the EW link to the article itself - as I think they did a really good job using the voices involved to give a sense of what that time was like.

I've also posted a link to a RENT video. It is 1996 and all of us are on the Rosie show...

Look - it's my natural hair color and my former nose. What a walk down memory lane...


Here is a link to the Article:



And here is a link to the Video:


Thursday, February 21, 2008

P &S



I love this!

Isn't it wonderful when 2 worlds can come together?!

Panis Angelicus was one of the first church songs my singing teacher made me sing. I resisted but loved this song. It was in Latin, and as a Catholic, I should have known ( on some level) what the f**k I was singing about but I didn't. All I knew was it was about Angels and it was beautiful...

I was in RENT playing Maureen and Pavoratti came to see the show. After the show he came back stage and grasped my hand and he said - " You are a beautiful lesbian" - LOL!

I'm neither a lesbian or beautiful...but when he ssid those words - I believed him. What a tremendous spirit.

As for Sting. I've always loved his voice (and ass) and what I especially love about this video is his insecurity.

Sting is a bad ass and can sing circles around most pop singers but he threw himself in an arena where he, really, had no place being in - and he ROCKED IT!

Their two voices combine so beautifully...

I love this. I really do. These two voices, together, confirm that sometimes God exists...

A Family Dinner



A Family Dinner.

Wishing I was sitting at the table with my sister, mom and brothers.

I love LA but miss my blood line.

Dysfunctional as it is.

Reminder: Radiohead - In Rainbows...

I can't stop listening to it.

I wish any of this had meaning.

In Rainbows does.

Saturday, February 16, 2008

Hillary 2008

I've been relatively quiet on the political front. I dig both of our candidates and when I went into the voting booth - it was a serious decision. That said - I had to back Hillary.

Look - Barak is great, sounds great and has so much potential but our government is so screwed after this evil Bush adminstration - We need someone who knows the territory like the back of(her)hand and we need them (her) to clean house.

She has led the way on so many fronts and has fought back against sexism, the right wing conspiracy (that truly exists) and has broken down doors all over the place.

She was working for health care before it was in the forefront. she has worked for children's right, gay rights, civil and women's rights.

Is she a political, hungry animal? - YES! But so is Barak.....

He gets applauded for his drive while she is discredited for seeking the office...

When she gains in the delegates she is the "presumed candidate" as opposed to when Barak gain delegates he is applauded for his "momentum"...

Look - Barak is a gret, a new wave and if the country decides to back him - so will I. He has the youth behind him and that says something because the youth are our future and are the ones more likely to think outside of the box...

That said - Hillary, for all her faults, is a gutsy, intelligent manager who, I believe, will bring the change we are all talking about....!

Saturday, February 2, 2008

Radiohead



I've been bad this month and posted basically jack..............

This is a lame post but important as RADIOHEAD is the best band ever. Buy In Rainbows. It takes a few times to listen to and get.....first time through I was confused but like all Radiohead - it circles all in and through you and eventually over takes your soul.

Truly - best band around right now.

Thursday, January 10, 2008

Gloria's Thoughts

January 8, 2008

Op-Ed Contributor
Women Are Never Front-Runners
By GLORIA STEINEM
Correction Appended

THE woman in question became a lawyer after some years as a community organizer, married a corporate lawyer and is the mother of two little girls, ages 9 and 6. Herself the daughter of a white American mother and a black African father — in this race-conscious country, she is considered black — she served as a state legislator for eight years, and became an inspirational voice for national unity.

Be honest: Do you think this is the biography of someone who could be elected to the United States Senate? After less than one term there, do you believe she could be a viable candidate to head the most powerful nation on earth?

If you answered no to either question, you’re not alone. Gender is probably the most restricting force in American life, whether the question is who must be in the kitchen or who could be in the White House. This country is way down the list of countries electing women and, according to one study, it polarizes gender roles more than the average democracy.

That’s why the Iowa primary was following our historical pattern of making change. Black men were given the vote a half-century before women of any race were allowed to mark a ballot, and generally have ascended to positions of power, from the military to the boardroom, before any women (with the possible exception of obedient family members in the latter).

If the lawyer described above had been just as charismatic but named, say, Achola Obama instead of Barack Obama, her goose would have been cooked long ago. Indeed, neither she nor Hillary Clinton could have used Mr. Obama’s public style — or Bill Clinton’s either — without being considered too emotional by Washington pundits.

So why is the sex barrier not taken as seriously as the racial one? The reasons are as pervasive as the air we breathe: because sexism is still confused with nature as racism once was; because anything that affects males is seen as more serious than anything that affects “only” the female half of the human race; because children are still raised mostly by women (to put it mildly) so men especially tend to feel they are regressing to childhood when dealing with a powerful woman; because racism stereotyped black men as more “masculine” for so long that some white men find their presence to be masculinity-affirming (as long as there aren’t too many of them); and because there is still no “right” way to be a woman in public power without being considered a you-know-what.

I’m not advocating a competition for who has it toughest. The caste systems of sex and race are interdependent and can only be uprooted together. That’s why Senators Clinton and Obama have to be careful not to let a healthy debate turn into the kind of hostility that the news media love. Both will need a coalition of outsiders to win a general election. The abolition and suffrage movements progressed when united and were damaged by division; we should remember that.
I’m supporting Senator Clinton because like Senator Obama she has community organizing experience, but she also has more years in the Senate, an unprecedented eight years of on-the-job training in the White House, no masculinity to prove, the potential to tap a huge reservoir of this country’s talent by her example, and now even the courage to break the no-tears rule. I’m not opposing Mr. Obama; if he’s the nominee, I’ll volunteer. Indeed, if you look at votes during their two-year overlap in the Senate, they were the same more than 90 percent of the time. Besides, to clean up the mess left by President Bush, we may need two terms of President Clinton and two of President Obama.

But what worries me is that he is seen as unifying by his race while she is seen as divisive by her sex.

What worries me is that she is accused of “playing the gender card” when citing the old boys’ club, while he is seen as unifying by citing civil rights confrontations.

What worries me is that male Iowa voters were seen as gender-free when supporting their own, while female voters were seen as biased if they did and disloyal if they didn’t.

What worries me is that reporters ignore Mr. Obama’s dependence on the old — for instance, the frequent campaign comparisons to John F. Kennedy — while not challenging the slander that her progressive policies are part of the Washington status quo.

What worries me is that some women, perhaps especially younger ones, hope to deny or escape the sexual caste system; thus Iowa women over 50 and 60, who disproportionately supported Senator Clinton, proved once again that women are the one group that grows more radical with age.

This country can no longer afford to choose our leaders from a talent pool limited by sex, race, money, powerful fathers and paper degrees. It’s time to take equal pride in breaking all the barriers. We have to be able to say: “I’m supporting her because she’ll be a great president and because she’s a woman.”

Gloria Steinem is a co-founder of the Women’s Media Center.
Correction: January 9, 2008
An Op-Ed article yesterday about Hillary Rodham Clinton misstated

Monday, January 7, 2008

A&E

I wish I was still young.

I wish I was fuckin gorgeous.

I wish I was the lead singer of Goldfrapp.

This is the song I would have written and the video I would have directed if I had been a pop star...

Friday, January 4, 2008

Major Andrew Olmsted

Major Andrew Olmsted had been writing a blog for the Rocky Mountain News while in Iraq. He knew the risks and had asked a friend to post a final blog entry if the worse happened.


It did.




January 04, 2008
Final Post


"I am leaving this message for you because it appears I must leave sooner than I intended. I would have preferred to say this in person, but since I cannot, let me say it here."G'Kar, Babylon 5



"Only the dead have seen the end of war."Plato*


This is an entry I would have preferred not to have published, but there are limits to what we can control in life, and apparently I have passed one of those limits. And so, like G'Kar, I must say here what I would much prefer to say in person. I want to thank hilzoy for putting it up for me. It's not easy asking anyone to do something for you in the event of your death, and it is a testament to her quality that she didn't hesitate to accept the charge. As with many bloggers, I have a disgustingly large ego, and so I just couldn't bear the thought of not being able to have the last word if the need arose. Perhaps I take that further than most, I don't know. I hope so. It's frightening to think there are many people as neurotic as I am in the world. In any case, since I won't get another chance to say what I think, I wanted to take advantage of this opportunity. Such as it is.


"When some people die, it's time to be sad. But when other people die, like really evil people, or the Irish, it's time to celebrate."Jimmy Bender, "Greg the Bunny"


"And maybe now it's your turnTo die kicking some ass."Freedom Isn't Free, Team America



What I don't want this to be is a chance for me, or anyone else, to be maudlin. I'm dead. That sucks, at least for me and my family and friends. But all the tears in the world aren't going to bring me back, so I would prefer that people remember the good things about me rather than mourning my loss. (If it turns out a specific number of tears will, in fact, bring me back to life, then by all means, break out the onions.) I had a pretty good life, as I noted above. Sure, all things being equal I would have preferred to have more time, but I have no business complaining with all the good fortune I've enjoyed in my life. So if you're up for that, put on a little 80s music (preferably vintage 1980-1984), grab a Coke and have a drink with me. If you have it, throw 'Freedom Isn't Free' from the Team America soundtrack in; if you can't laugh at that song, I think you need to lighten up a little. I'm dead, but if you're reading this, you're not, so take a moment to enjoy that happy fact.




"Our thoughts form the universe. They always matter."Citizen G'Kar, Babylon 5


Believe it or not, one of the things I will miss most is not being able to blog any longer. The ability to put my thoughts on (virtual) paper and put them where people can read and respond to them has been marvelous, even if most people who have read my writings haven't agreed with them. If there is any hope for the long term success of democracy, it will be if people agree to listen to and try to understand their political opponents rather than simply seeking to crush them. While the blogosphere has its share of partisans, there are some awfully smart people making excellent arguments out there as well, and I know I have learned quite a bit since I began blogging. I flatter myself I may have made a good argument or two as well; if I didn't, please don't tell me. It has been a great five-plus years. I got to meet a lot of people who are way smarter than me, including such luminaries as Virginia Postrel and her husband Stephen (speaking strictly from a 'improving the species' perspective, it's tragic those two don't have kids, because they're both scary smart.), the estimable hilzoy and Sebastian of Obsidian Wings, Jeff Goldstein and Stephen Green, the men who consistently frustrated me with their mix of wit and wisdom I could never match, and I've no doubt left out a number of people to whom I apologize. Bottom line: if I got the chance to meet you through blogging, I enjoyed it. I'm only sorry I couldn't meet more of you. In particular I'd like to thank Jim Henley, who while we've never met has been a true comrade, whose words have taught me and whose support has been of great personal value to me. I would very much have enjoyed meeting Jim.


Blogging put me in touch with an inordinate number of smart people, an exhilarating if humbling experience. When I was young, I was smart, but the older I got, the more I realized just how dumb I was in comparison to truly smart people. But, to my credit, I think, I was at least smart enough to pay attention to the people with real brains and even occasionally learn something from them. It has been joy and a pleasure having the opportunity to do this.


"It's not fair.""No. It's not. Death never is."Captain John Sheridan and Dr. Stephen Franklin, Babylon 5


"They didn't even dig him a decent grave.""Well, it's not how you're buried. It's how you're remembered."Cimarron and Wil Andersen, The Cowboys


I suppose I should speak to the circumstances of my death. It would be nice to believe that I died leading men in battle, preferably saving their lives at the cost of my own. More likely I was caught by a marksman or an IED. But if there is an afterlife, I'm telling anyone who asks that I went down surrounded by hundreds of insurgents defending a village composed solely of innocent women and children. It'll be our little secret, ok?


I do ask (not that I'm in a position to enforce this) that no one try to use my death to further their political purposes. I went to Iraq and did what I did for my reasons, not yours. My life isn't a chit to be used to bludgeon people to silence on either side. If you think the U.S. should stay in Iraq, don't drag me into it by claiming that somehow my death demands us staying in Iraq. If you think the U.S. ought to get out tomorrow, don't cite my name as an example of someone's life who was wasted by our mission in Iraq. I have my own opinions about what we should do about Iraq, but since I'm not around to expound on them I'd prefer others not try and use me as some kind of moral capital to support a position I probably didn't support. Further, this is tough enough on my family without their having to see my picture being used in some rally or my name being cited for some political purpose. You can fight political battles without hurting my family, and I'd prefer that you did so.


On a similar note, while you're free to think whatever you like about my life and death, if you think I wasted my life, I'll tell you you're wrong. We're all going to die of something. I died doing a job I loved. When your time comes, I hope you are as fortunate as I was.


"What an idiot! What a loser!"Chaz Reingold, Wedding Crashers


"Oh and I don't want to die for you, but if dying's asked of me;I'll bear that cross with honor, 'cause freedom don't come free."American Soldier, Toby Keith


Those who know me through my writings on the Internet over the past five-plus years probably have wondered at times about my chosen profession. While I am not a Libertarian, I certainly hold strongly individualistic beliefs. Yet I have spent my life in a profession that is not generally known for rugged individualism. Worse, I volunteered to return to active duty knowing that the choice would almost certainly lead me to Iraq. The simple explanation might be that I was simply stupid, and certainly I make no bones about having done some dumb things in my life, but I don't think this can be chalked up to stupidity. Maybe I was inconsistent in my beliefs; there are few people who adhere religiously to the doctrines of their chosen philosophy, whatever that may be. But I don't think that was the case in this instance either.
As passionate as I am about personal freedom, I don't buy the claims of anarchists that humanity would be just fine without any government at all. There are too many people in the world who believe that they know best how people should live their lives, and many of them are more than willing to use force to impose those beliefs on others. A world without government simply wouldn't last very long; as soon as it was established, strongmen would immediately spring up to establish their fiefdoms. So there is a need for government to protect the people's rights. And one of the fundamental tools to do that is an army that can prevent outside agencies from imposing their rules on a society. A lot of people will protest that argument by noting that the people we are fighting in Iraq are unlikely to threaten the rights of the average American. That's certainly true; while our enemies would certainly like to wreak great levels of havoc on our society, the fact is they're not likely to succeed. But that doesn't mean there isn't still a need for an army (setting aside debates regarding whether ours is the right size at the moment). Americans are fortunate that we don't have to worry too much about people coming to try and overthrow us, but part of the reason we don't have to worry about that is because we have an army that is stopping anyone who would try.


Soldiers cannot have the option of opting out of missions because they don't agree with them: that violates the social contract. The duly-elected American government decided to go to war in Iraq. (Even if you maintain President Bush was not properly elected, Congress voted for war as well.) As a soldier, I have a duty to obey the orders of the President of the United States as long as they are Constitutional. I can no more opt out of missions I disagree with than I can ignore laws I think are improper. I do not consider it a violation of my individual rights to have gone to Iraq on orders because I raised my right hand and volunteered to join the army. Whether or not this mission was a good one, my participation in it was an affirmation of something I consider quite necessary to society. So if nothing else, I gave my life for a pretty important principle; I can (if you'll pardon the pun) live with that.


"It's all so brief, isn't it? A typical human lifespan is almost a hundred years. But it's barely a second compared to what's out there. It wouldn't be so bad if life didn't take so long to figure out. Seems you just start to get it right, and then...it's over."Dr. Stephen Franklin, Babylon 5


I wish I could say I'd at least started to get it right. Although, in my defense, I think I batted a solid .250 or so. Not a superstar, but at least able to play in the big leagues. I'm afraid I can't really offer any deep secrets or wisdom. I lived my life better than some, worse than others, and I like to think that the world was a little better off for my having been here. Not very much, but then, few of us are destined to make more than a tiny dent in history's Green Monster. I would be lying if I didn't admit I would have liked to have done more, but it's a bit too late for that now, eh? The bottom line, for me, is that I think I can look back at my life and at least see a few areas where I may have made a tiny difference, and massive ego aside, that's probably not too bad.


"The flame also reminds us that life is precious. As each flame is unique; when it goes out, it's gone forever. There will never be another quite like it."Ambassador Delenn, Babylon 5


I write this in part, admittedly, because I would like to think that there's at least a little something out there to remember me by. Granted, this site will eventually vanish, being ephemeral in a very real sense of the word, but at least for a time it can serve as a tiny record of my contributions to the world. But on a larger scale, for those who knew me well enough to be saddened by my death, especially for those who haven't known anyone else lost to this war, perhaps my death can serve as a small reminder of the costs of war. Regardless of the merits of this war, or of any war, I think that many of us in America have forgotten that war means death and suffering in wholesale lots. A decision that for most of us in America was academic, whether or not to go to war in Iraq, had very real consequences for hundreds of thousands of people. Yet I was as guilty as anyone of minimizing those very real consequences in lieu of a cold discussion of theoretical merits of war and peace. Now I'm facing some very real consequences of that decision; who says life doesn't have a sense of humor?


But for those who knew me and feel this pain, I think it's a good thing to realize that this pain has been felt by thousands and thousands (probably millions, actually) of other people all over the world. That is part of the cost of war, any war, no matter how justified. If everyone who feels this pain keeps that in mind the next time we have to decide whether or not war is a good idea, perhaps it will help us to make a more informed decision. Because it is pretty clear that the average American would not have supported the Iraq War had they known the costs going in. I am far too cynical to believe that any future debate over war will be any less vitriolic or emotional, but perhaps a few more people will realize just what those costs can be the next time.
This may be a contradiction of my above call to keep politics out of my death, but I hope not. Sometimes going to war is the right idea. I think we've drawn that line too far in the direction of war rather than peace, but I'm a soldier and I know that sometimes you have to fight if you're to hold onto what you hold dear. But in making that decision, I believe we understate the costs of war; when we make the decision to fight, we make the decision to kill, and that means lives and families destroyed. Mine now falls into that category; the next time the question of war or peace comes up, if you knew me at least you can understand a bit more just what it is you're deciding to do, and whether or not those costs are worth it.


"This is true love. You think this happens every day?"Westley, The Princess Bride


"Good night, my love, the brightest star in my sky."John Sheridan, Babylon 5


This is the hardest part. While I certainly have no desire to die, at this point I no longer have any worries. That is not true of the woman who made my life something to enjoy rather than something merely to survive. She put up with all of my faults, and they are myriad, she endured separations again and again...I cannot imagine being more fortunate in love than I have been with Amanda. Now she has to go on without me, and while a cynic might observe she's better off, I know that this is a terrible burden I have placed on her, and I would give almost anything if she would not have to bear it. It seems that is not an option. I cannot imagine anything more painful than that, and if there is an afterlife, this is a pain I'll bear forever.


I wasn't the greatest husband. I could have done so much more, a realization that, as it so often does, comes too late to matter. But I cherished every day I was married to Amanda. When everything else in my life seemed dark, she was always there to light the darkness. It is difficult to imagine my life being worth living without her having been in it. I hope and pray that she goes on without me and enjoys her life as much as she deserves. I can think of no one more deserving of happiness than her.


"I will see you again, in the place where no shadows fall."Ambassador Delenn, Babylon 5


I don't know if there is an afterlife; I tend to doubt it, to be perfectly honest. But if there is any way possible, Amanda, then I will live up to Delenn's words, somehow, some way. I love you.



Posted at January 4, 2008 11:18 AM